Total Number of Clips: 1
Entry #1
CBS 2010-07-22 22:35:00 UTC
CBS 2010-07-22 22:35:00 UTC
CBS 2010-07-22 22:35:00 UTC
CBS 2010-07-22 22:35:00 UTC
CBS 2010-07-22 22:35:00 UTC
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CBS Evening News With Katie Couric
CBS (CBS)National Programming, DMA: 0
Jul 22 2010 6:35PM EDT
Programming Type: News
the good news is those high seas do help a little bit, they help to break up some of that oil. katie? >> couric: all right, kelly cobiella. kelly, thanks very much. meanwhile, a senate committee is investigating whether b.p. played a role in scotland's decision to release the lockerbie bomber last year. today, scottish ministers turned down a request to testify before the committee and b.p. says c.e.o. tony hayward has not yet decided whether he'll appear. now to the storm that erupted in washington after the agriculture department fired shirley sherrod in a rush to judgment. she accepted an apology from the white house yesterday but said she wanted to talk to the president. and today he called her. chip reid is our chief white house correspondent and, chip, another day; another apology. >> reporter: that's right, katie. the apologies just keep coming. yesterday it was robert gibbs and the agriculture secretary, today the president himself. >> reporter: the president has avoided public comment on the firing of shirley sherrod. >> thank you. >> reporter: but today from his private study he joined the chorus of administration officials offering her an apology. >> she did accept his apology. >> reporter: the white house says it took the president three tries over two days to reach her. she called it a very good conversation. >> he wanted me to know he's supportive and... i've been dealing with some of the same issues he's had to deal with. >> reporter: sherrod was fired monday after a conservative web site released portions of a speech she gave earlier this year. she appeared to say that years ago she was reluctant to help a struggling farmer because he was white. but the full speech shows she was describing the need for racial reconciliation. >> the president said i think there's an opportunity for you to continue that work if you want to do so. >> reporter: sherrod says she hadn't decided if she'll accept that offer. there may be good reason for the president's public silence. the last time he stepped into a race controversy was a year ago today when he criticized the arrest of his friend, professor henry louis gates >> the cambridge police acted stupidly. >> reporter: and rember that led to a week-long media firestorm and culminated in the so-called beer summit at the white house. certainly president would like to avoid that kind of circus this time around. katie? >> couric: chip reid at the white house. chip, thank you. the sherrod case has put a spotlight on the u.s.d.a.'s long history of discrimination against black farmers. more about that now from national correspondent dean reynolds. >> reporter: willie adams '60-acre georgia farm has been in his family since 1938 and he wants to hold on to its red clay and green pastures for generations to come. but the fight to keep it is increasingly stressful. >> high blood pressure, almost a heart attack. (laughs) oh, yeah. a lot of stress. >> reporter: adams is one of a dwindling number of african american farmers, some 33,000 in all. >> we want equal justice! >> reporter: they're hoping congress will at last end decades of discrimination against them and appropriate the $1.25 billion they and their an ancestors won in a settlement with the department of agriculture in february. a court found the farmers had been systematically denied aid solely because they were black. loans, grants, and subsidies that white farmers received. willie adams says u.s.d.a. officials always claimed to him and other blacks that they lacked the funding. but you saw that they did have funds available for other people. >> yes. >> reporter: agriculture secretary tom vilsack says those days must end. >> i made it as a goal when i took this office that we would try to reverse that history. >> reporter: as for the settlement compensation, congress has yet to approve it and even if it does... >> it would be a very bittersweet victory for us because i've seen so many black farmers pass waiting for justice. >> reporter: willie adams is waiting, too. mr. adams has wanted to expand his business for years, to build a new greenhouse or to buy up new livestock for his farm. today he's raising collard greens, squash and okra, but he says the farm's been starved without the government assistance other farmers take for granted. >> trying to save the land, that's the main thing, saving the homeland. >> reporter: he wonders why shirley sherrod was fired hours after that misleading tape surfaced but other department officials were not fired for years of discrimination, raising doubts about the government's commitment to close what it calls an unfortunate chapter. dean reynolds, cbs news, greensboro, georgia. >> couric: in washington, after a long investigation, the house ethics committee today charged congressman charles rangel with a variety of ethics violations. and another house panel will now put him on trial. if convicted, the new york democrat, who was forced to give up the chairmanship of the ways and means committee, could be censured or expelled. now the battle over arizona's
Total Number of Clips: 1

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